From Diagnosis to Surgery – Part 2

After the surgery was cancelled, I probably hit one of the lowest points of my life. I was completely spent, both physically due to the lack of sleep, and emotionally due to… Everything.

I had marked the day in my diary. I had really focussed all my energy on holding up until the third of December, on pushing all my feelings aside, on staying strong. And when that day turned out to be just another day of limbo, another day where I still had cancer, I crumbled.

The day after the cancelled surgery, my father left. He was concerned, but I kept reassuring him that I was going to be fine. What I really wanted was to be alone, to lie in bed in the dark and wallow. I had never been one for wallowing – I am usually restless, and the thought of doing nothing gives me anxiety. But for the first time of my life, I wanted to do nothing, think about nothing and just let the hours and days pass.

I had to call work, explain what had happened. I actually cannot remember how I did it. Maybe I emailed my manager, maybe I phoned her – I have absolutely no recollection of that. All I remember is her telling me not to come into work that week, but to stay home and take care of myself.

I did not, not at first. About an hour after my dad left, my phone rang. One of the doctors on my team, the one who had been with the surgeon the day before, was calling to ask me how I was doing, and to confirm the date when the surgery would finally happen. I apologised for breaking into tears and falling apart the day before, I apologised on behalf of my father for him having lost his cool, she apologised on behalf of the hospital for not having been able to perform the surgery I was so looking forward to.

She reassured me that nothing would change in the two and a bit weeks until the new surgery day. The cancer would not grow, it would not spread, the prognosis would not suddenly worsen. I felt like I could breathe a little bit better. But then she stopped, and told me that unfortunately, I would have to have another MRI.

They cannot, or will not, operate on a patient without an MRI dated less than six weeks. Mine expired two days after the date of the original surgery. Delaying it by two weeks meant I would have to take another one. Just that thought made me lose it again altogether. I was in tears on the phone, I could not wait to hang up and slip under my blanket again. She told me I would receive a letter informing me of the appointment for the scan, and that she would see me a couple of weeks later.

Despite her reassurance that everything would be fine, that it was unlikely that the cancer had spread further, I was terrified again. In my head, there was still a chance the new MRI would show some significant change. A part of me understood that it was a just formality, that it was something they had to do to comply with their stringent processes, not because they were particularly worried. But another part of me was convinced that if they needed a more recent scan in order to carry out the surgery, it meant that there was a possibility that things had changed. And knowing my luck, the odds would be that it had gone against everyone’s expectations, yet again.

I spent the rest of the week at home, watching TV shows and doing the Christmas crafts I had planned for my recovery. On the Friday and Saturday, I went to the gym a total of five times. I had had a sudden regain of energy, and I could not sit still. And then, it was time to go back to work for the last ten days of the year.

It felt wrong to be back at work, but it felt good to be able to focus on something. I fielded questions about why I had been away the week before, and why I was back when I had told everyone I would be away for the rest of the year. My mind was half there, half on the surgery – the one that was cancelled and the one that was still to come.

The MRI was scheduled for that week. The friend who had been coming to most of my appointments drove me there again – another nice little trip to Oxford. This time, it took three members of staff and 30 minutes to locate a vein and place a cannula into my arm to inject the muscle relaxant and contrasting agent needed for the scan. It took so long that when I emerged from the prep room, my friend thought we were done with the MRI and got up. But no, they were simply taking me from one end of the ward to the other to carry out the actual scan.

No music this time – different hospital, different processes. I had earplugs. I closed my eyes, and in I went. Each cycle of the machine to take a scan seemed to last longer than the last. I felt nauseous, I had trouble breathing but they kept telling me to try and stay still, to breathe as calmly as possible so as not to blur the images. Finally, someone came into the room to let me know I was done. I turned around and sat up, putting my feet on the floor. I felt faint as soon as I started standing up, and had to sit back down. They tell you that you should not drive for an hour after being injected with muscle relaxant. I do not know if that was linked, but it took me over five minutes to be able to get up and walk back into the waiting room.

The next two weeks went by very slowly, and extremely fast as well. Work was busy. I managed to attend the Christmas party for our whole company, which is usually a huge bash that I barely remember the next day. This time, I was not drinking, but it went by in a flash. I was the sober friend dancing the night away.

At the weekend, I met up with a group of friends and went to the Oxford Christmas market. It felt almost incongruous to be in Oxford for something that was not cancer-related. It was all I could think about. There, in the midst of my friends who were chatting about their Christmas plans and theirs wishes for the New Year, I felt out of place. I felt so detached from everything that was happening around me. It felt like I was watching the world go past, do its own thing, and I was just there, witnessing it all without taking part. I did not know what my Christmas would be like, nor did I know what I could expect for the months and years to come.

My mum had made plans to come and stay with me for that second surgery. She would then stay all the way through Christmas, when my brothers would join us for a few days, before they all left on Boxing Day. Then, a couple of my uni friends would come and stay until New Year’s Day. It felt good to have plans, to have a schedule to look forward to once the operation was over. I had no idea how I would feel, whether I would be able to walk, but I knew I would have people with me.

The day before the surgery, I was off work again. I met my mum in London – she was coming by public transport, and I did not want to let her loose on the tube – who knows what could have happened. We had lunch in London, and then took the train back to mine. I laughed at how she struggled to walk up the hill from the train station to my place. For over a year, she had made fun of me for being overdramatic about living at the top of a steep hill. Well, that served you right, mum.

I had been told to be at the hospital at 7am, as soon as it opened. I was first on the list for that day, so there would be no delays. We took a taxi to Oxford, I was watching the sun rise outside the windows. We arrived early (very out of character for me), and walked into the hospital. This time, I knew the shortest way to get to the surgery ward. I knew which turns to take, which papers to present to the nurse behind the desk. Christmas decorations were up, and the bell stuck to the front of the desk kept falling to the floor. I picked it up a couple of times whilst we waited.

I was called in for them to check a few details – I confirmed I had not eaten since the previous night, and all I had had for breakfast was a glass of water. They put hospital bracelets on my wrists – the same ones I had had two weeks previously, and which I had torn away from my arms on the way home. They told me the surgery would probably start around 10-10.30, after the surgeon had visited the wards. I spoke with the anaesthetist again – a different one to the one I had seen before. I had to take a pregnancy test – the last one of my life. It felt ridiculous but also so meaningful.

I went back to the waiting room, prepared to wait for a long time. But they called me back in almost immediately, to meet the team that would handle the surgery. This felt like the moment of truth. We were in the exact same room where they had cancelled the surgery before. But this time, it was different. The doctors were not the same. This time, it was the right one. I signed consent forms, I confirmed I understood everything and I was ready for it. And then, they asked me to change into a hospital gown, put on my dressing gown and slippers. I left my suitcase with them and a nurse gave me a bag in which we would put the belongings I still had with me. And then she told me to go back to the waiting room whilst they prepared everything.

I went back and sat down next to my mum. We chatted for a while. It was nowhere near 10am, so I assumed we still had still some time left. But after a few minutes, a nurse came in and asked me to follow her. I turned to my my mum, I did not quite know what to say. The nurse must have understood, because she said ‘Oh, is that your mum? Come on, give her a hug!’.

I am not a hugger. I cannot remember ever hugging my parents – I am sure I must have done but not in the last fifteen years, at least. I hesitated, but then said ‘Oh, we’re not really like that.’ I keep thinking about that moment. My mum probably would have liked a hug, but she did not say it. So I nodded, and probably said something meaningless.

I followed the nurse through the door. I could see someone rolling my suitcase to the lockers where it would stay until I woke up, and I realised at that point that my phone was still in the pocked of my dressing gown. I ran to give it to them – I guess I needed to do one last silly thing before the surgery.

I remember walking down a long corridor, past a number of closed and open doors. They had told me it would be cold but I think the adrenaline running through my veins made it impossible for me to feel it. We arrived into the room where they would put me under. It was not what I expected. There was a hospital bed for me to lie on. Lots of medical equipment. A second nurse, and the anaesthetist.

My memories there are quite vague. They needed to put a cannula in my arm, for administering medications and fluids. I remember telling them about my fine veins, and them saying they would put it in the back of my hand anyway so it did not matter. I remember thinking how odd it was, to have something stuck in my hand like that. Over ten months later, I still have the scar on my hand. It is a tiny, round scar. No-one else can see it, but as I sit writing this, I stare at it. It is the first scar I got as a result of my cancer.

I have no idea how they administered the anaesthetic. They tell you that your brain stores traumatic events away, that you have a selective memory for these moments you could have done without. This is where my pre-surgery memories end.

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