World Cancer Day

Today was World Cancer Day. A day to celebrate those who won, remember those we lost, support those who are still fighting and give hope to those who will fight in the future. A day to raise awareness and stop being afraid.

It was a long day. I woke up in pain from the physical repercussions of my low oestrogen levels. I had my first counselling session. I cried hot, burning tears. I had flash-back. I said words I had never said out loud. I took another step towards recovery.

On this day, we all have a part to play. Whether it is taking care of your own body, paying attention to the signs, raising awareness, remembering a friend, making a donation towards cancer research, saying a kind word to a loved one fighting cancer, driving someone to an appointment or listening to someone’s story – it all matters.

And on this day, I am grateful to everyone who has been part of my cancer journey, however big or small your contribution was. Thank you. It all matters.

Talking About Cancer – Making Light of It

Today marks exactly one year since the day my operation was first scheduled. It is also six days until my next check-up at the hospital, for the dreaded one-year mark (or as close as we could get without having me go for a check-up at Christmas).

At the moment, it is impossible for me to spend any length of time during the day not thinking about cancer. It permeates everything, it colours every feeling, every decision I make. It makes me cry, it makes me sick with worry, it makes me crumble to the floor in the shower until the water goes cold, it makes me forget how to breathe in the middle of my morning walk, and fall over in the park.

Because cancer is all-consuming, it is almost impossible to push it to the back of your mind, and not think about it at all. You need to find other ways to cope. Ways to tame cancer, to make it less of a threat, make it into a subject you can discuss, something that can make you laugh as well as cry.

I have found that making light of cancer helps. Making jokes, bringing it up in an unexpected way and observing people’s reactions can be priceless. When you make fun of it, for a few seconds, it no longer is the big C, or the other C-word. It is cancer, and it is something you can bring up without fear, something you have earned the right to laugh about.

I have always loved dry humour. Saying something unexpected, sometimes a bit dark but that will bring a laugh upon someone’s lips – or a shocked gasp, depending on who my audience is.

Just this week, even though I am battling one of the darkest weeks I have had all year, I made two of my ‘cancer jokes’, and it felt amazing. They were awkward, they were uncomfortable. They were not necessarily funny – I definitely will not be quitting my day job to start a career as a comedian – but they did make me feel more in control. For a few precious seconds, it felt like cancer was mine to beat, mine to laugh at. If I can laugh about it, surely it cannot hurt me anymore.

I was on the phone with a friend at the weekend, and we were talking about how I have been having a lot of mood swings and have been feeling very tearful lately – even more so than usual. My friend was asking whether I thought it might be hormone-related, or could it be an issue with my antidepressants maybe? In a deadpan, slow voice, I interrupted her and said ‘God, I hope I’m not pregnant’. A couple of seconds of silence, and an awkward laugh followed. Sorry to have made you uncomfortable – personally, I think that has been the highlight of my week so far.

The other joke I made was during a group video call, with a lot more people than I am usually comfortable with. I had not spoken to some of them since the summer of 2019, before it all happened, but they all knew, either because they had been told by other people or they saw something on social media, or read this blog. We were talking about how long it had been since we last saw each other, and I said ‘well, it’s been a while. Last time we spoke, I still had a uterus’. Some faces looked shocked. There were a couple of laughs, a few shaking heads and one amused ‘Can’t argue with that’.

I have been using humour to cope for months now. Earlier this year, I uploaded a selfie on social media, showcasing my brand new short hair and using a caption that would have made my mum cringe: ‘Getting rid of my hair like I got rid of that cancer – #snipsnip’. I felt so powerful in that moment. Cancer was nothing more than a punchline. Snip snip, my hair. Snip snip, cancer.

I understand these comments might make people uncomfortable. Not everyone is happy to have a laugh about something so serious. But for me, it is a way of getting over it, of proving that cancer is not as threatening as it looks, of feeling like I have the upper hand for once.

I think it is also important to show people that I can laugh about it. If I can make jokes, if I can make light of a terrible situation, maybe people will start feeling comfortable around me and my issues. Maybe they can make their own jokes, and I will laugh at them – no puns though, nothing make me cringe more than a bad pun.

I have earned the right to make those jokes, and to laugh when you make one. Not everyone with cancer will see it that way, and for some people cancer will always stay off-limits. For me, making light of cancer is proof that it has not taken over my sense of humour. I can still be hysterical.

Well. Not etymologically.

Talking About Cancer – The Power of Words

Cancer is big. If there is one thing that we can all agree on, it is that cancer is massive. When you first hear the words, it upends your life in a second. And then, it starts affecting the people around you, your friends, your support network, your family, people you had not thought about. And what I have come to realise is that we all have one thing in common: we struggle to find the right words to address cancer, and discuss it.

Does it come from a place of fear? The word ‘cancer’ itself is unnerving. A couple of years ago, I told off my older brother, who had started using the phrase ‘c’est cancer’ (‘it’s cancer’) to say ‘that sucks’. He had picked it up from some French gamer on Twitch, and was using it so much it drove me crazy, and not just because it is grammatically incorrect. I told him it made me uncomfortable, and I think that was because of the power I gave that word. In my mind, ‘cancer’ had always represented something horrendous, something so severe that the word itself made me feel scared.

I have now come to terms with it. I can say the word without feeling anything, without feeling scared or crying. It is everything else that I struggle with.

There is no right way to talk about cancer. There are no right words, because they all feel wrong. They feel like they should not have been uttered. They feel private, they feel hurtful, they feel dangerous.

From the moment you decide to talk to people about your condition, you have to be careful what words to use. How to even start the conversation. I think every time I told someone, I started with some version of ‘I just wanted to share something with you – I have had some bad news. I was at the hospital the other day and […]’. I felt like that was a good start. It prepares your audience for what is to come. It is not as abrupt as coming out and saying ‘I have cancer’ straightaway. By making it into a story, with an introduction, by setting the tone and narrating it like a tale, it almost made me feel like I had it together. It was a story, it had a beginning and a clear narrative structure. And when the word ‘cancer’ appeared, whoever I was talking to was not taken aback. I had led them there, and made their experience more peaceful than my own.

When talking about what happened to me, I am so careful about the words I use, the sentences I write. Consciously or not, I make a choice every time I talk about cancer. Just take the first sentence of this paragraph. ‘What happened to me’. That was a deliberate choice. Making it sound like something that came upon me, diluting the message by using a vague concept. It does not sound as real as ‘when talking about cancer’, does it? And it puts me in a passive role, a spectator to my own life. Just think about how long it takes me to write these blogs if I think about each word for that long.

I have always tried to find the right balance between melodrama and a cautious indifference. Depending on who I was talking to, I would adapt the way I spoke about cancer. I would speak about it freely with a couple of friends. I would tone it down for people at work, stressing that it was probably ‘very early-stage cancer’, even before I knew that for sure. I spoke about ‘treatment’ at length, without going into the details. I barely ever uttered the words ‘chemo’ and ‘radiotherapy’, even when I was discussing potential post-surgery treatment. I did not find comfort in the medical terms. Hysterectomy, FIGO stage, adjuvant therapy. They always felt cold, almost too severe for me. I am not a medical professional. If I had not been personally affected by cancer, I probably would not have used these words. By not using them, I was hiding from their reality, and it helped me cope for a while.

I also struggle with tenses. It does not feel like much, but I freeze every time I want to say ‘I had cancer’. Should I say ‘I have cancer’? Should I say ‘I have had cancer’? None of them feel right, and all of them feel right at the same time. I am not out of the woods yet, but I also do not technically still have cancer… Or do I? In my previous article, I typed the word ‘remission’, and only then did I notice that I had completely banished it from my vocabulary. It is an ugly word. It is a word that denotes the limbo I currently live in. Neither ill nor cured. Cancer might still be here, in my body, dormant and menacing, quiet and deceiving. I will try and use ‘remission’ more going forward, because it is the word that defines me best. I will get used to it, I promise.

There are other words that come to mind. I already spoke about the duality of the word ‘strong’, and how uncomfortable it makes me feel. ‘Cured’ is another one of those. ‘Lucky’. ‘Depression’. The list goes on. But there are also words that make me happy (ok, they are mostly the names of baby animals, I will never say no to a discussion about meerkittens and otter whelps).

It is true not just for me, but also for people I talk to every day. I am going to go out on a limb here, and say that I do not think that anyone (apart from health professionals) has said the word ‘cancer’ to me in at least six months, at least in reference to me. And I have discussed it with plenty of people. I have used it myself. I speak to a few of my friends about it directly at least once a week. Is the word taboo? Do people avoid saying it because they are afraid of it, or afraid of how I will react? I will say it here – you can say cancer to me. You can even say it three times in a the mirror – I promise I will not come and haunt you.

People are so careful around cancer patients, worried about saying the wrong thing. But just so you know, there is no need to tread on eggshells around me. You can say anything you want. I have lived through it, there is nothing you can say that will shock me, that will trigger a reaction in me that I do not already trigger in myself twice a day.

Words are a big part of this, but talking about cancer goes beyond just that. It is an uncomfortable topic in general. I will see you at the weekend for a blog about how to make light of cancer – because we all need it sometimes.